AskDefine | Define et

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology 1

From French, from Latin

Conjunction

  1. and

Etymology 2

Verb

et
  1. past of eat

Estonian

Etymology

From the same Uralic root *e as Finnish että and Hungarian ez

Conjunction

et

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: et
  • lang=fi|[et]

Etymology 1

Verb

  1. The second-person singular form of the negation verb. The English translations include do not/don’t and not (with auxiliary verbs and be).

Usage notes

  • The negative verb is used with the connegative form of the main verb. That form is identical to the second-person singular imperative in the indicative present. The potential mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -ne-, and the conditional mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -isi-. In the indicative past, conditional past and potential past, the active past participle singular (ending -ut/-yt) is used. The connegative form of the main verb is always used without the personal suffix.
  • Usage of et:
  • Indicative:
  • Sinä näet. (You see.) -> Sinä et näe. (You do not see.)
  • Sinä näit. (You saw.) -> Sinä et nähnyt. (You did not see.)
  • Sinä olet nähnyt. (You have seen.) -> Sinä et ole nähnyt. (You have not seen.)
  • Sinä olit nähnyt. (You had seen.) -> Sinä et ollut nähnyt. (You had not seen.)
  • Conditional:
  • Sinä näkisit. (You would see.) -> Sinä et näkisi. (You would not see.)
  • Sinä olisit nähnyt. (You would have seen.) -> Sinä et olisi nähnyt. (You would not have seen.)
  • Potential:
  • Sinä nähnet. (You probably see.) -> Sinä et nähne. (You probably do not see.)
  • Sinä lienet nähnyt. (You have probably seen.) -> Sinä et liene nähnyt. (You have probably not seen.)

Conjugation

  • The negative verb has no infinitive form. The negative verb is the same with indicative, conditional and potential mood and, with those moods, it is conjugated only in person. (For the second-person singular of the negative verb in the imperative mood, see älä. An archaic optative mood has also a second-person singular form, ällös.)

Etymology 2

Shortened form of että.

Conjunction

  1. In the context of "subordinating|colloquial|lang=fi": That.
Synonyms

Anagrams

French

Etymology

From Latin

Pronunciation

  • [e]
  • /e/, /e/ (the t is not pronounced)
  • Rhymes: -e

Conjunction

et

Latin

Conjunction

et
  1. and
  2. plus
    duo et duo sunt quatter — two plus two equals four

Usage notes

  • When used in pairs, et...et may function like English both...and

Quotations

Synonyms

See also

Norwegian

Article

  1. an (indefinite article)

Spanish

Noun

et

Turkish

Pronunciation

  • /ɛt/

Noun

et [-ti]

Extensive Definition

Et (or et or &) is Latin and French for "and". Also see: List of Latin phrases (A–E)
Et can also be a past-tense form of "eat" (used similarly to "ate") used in some parts of eastern and southern USA.
Et, et and ET may also refer to:

Places and geography

Science and engineering

Sports

Music

Fiction

Medicine

Automotive industry

Other

et in Czech: ET
et in German: ET
et in Modern Greek (1453-): ET
et in Spanish: E.T.
et in Esperanto: Et
et in French: ET
et in Korean: ET
et in Italian: ET
et in Latin: ET
et in Dutch: ET
et in Japanese: ET
et in Polish: E.T.
et in Portuguese: ET
et in Kölsch: ET (Watt ėßß datt?)
et in Russian: ET
et in Slovenian: ET
et in Finnish: ET
et in Swedish: ET
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